Category Archives: Uncategorized

PrintRoom is closed from 10 – 19 August, wishing everyone great holidays!

24 – 30 July 2017: Holiday in the Archive – PrintRoom @ Centre des livres d’artistes

Holiday in the Archive

A chance encounter with a folder on coincidence – “Toeval” in the Centre des livres d’artistes (Cdla) – inspired a foraging system that enabled our exploration of the archive. Inventing categories of words with the second letter punctuated with an O created a metaphorical peephole through which to view the the contents of the boxes.

We have extracted selected items from the condensed collection of publications, conversations and exchanges between artists in the archive and redistributed them to people we think will find the collection of interest. Sending the archive on holiday.

Karin de Jong, Eleanor Vonne Brown, Asnate Bočkis, Yin Yin Wong, Antoine Lefebvre, Kate Briggs, Arnaud Desjardin.

Holiday in the Archive is a project by PrintRoom with thanks to Didier Mathieu at Cdla.

 

14 – 16 July 2017: PrintRoom joins Miss Read, The Berlin Art Book Festival

PrintRoom joins Miss Read

We’ll bring a selection of books by artists, publishers and designers who joined our programme in the past years and we’ll return with a selection of books from the fair for our shop. We’re looking forward to seeing you there – or come and see the new books soon!

PrintRoom will be closed these days

 

3 July 2017: Archival Erasures and Artistic Activism

Archives and Disobedience

5 – 8 pm at PrintRoom!

(Book)presentations and discussion, with:
Tanel Rander, Tina Bastajian and Ehsan Fardjadniya, Hodan Warsame and Tirza Balk and YOU.
The discussion is moderated by Margaret Tali, one of the editors

Join us for a discussion and presentation of the book “Archives and Disobedience: Changing tactics of visual culture in Eastern Europe” (2016), an edited collection of essays by artists and theorists. The book deals with the use of visual art and images in activism.
The discussion will focus on colonial erasures in different Eastern European contexts – Armenia, Poland, Estonia – and in the Netherlands. How do past erasures affect us in the present? And how have artists and activist dealt with them in their work? Can we learn from each other’s struggles? Presentations by Tanel Rander, Tina Bastajian and Ehsan Fardjadniya, Hodan Warsame and Tirza Balk.

The discussion is followed by a dinner.

You’re invited!!

The program is held in English.

Tina Bastajian will speak about the transits between the hidden, overlooked and exposed as the recurrent themes of her work. Rather than simply problematizing erasure, she is interested in the layers of absence and presence, ways of mining, undermining and overwriting them. She will introduce a work in progress, which is based on her essay in the book about Filmadaran, Armenian National Cinematheque in Yerevan. In her presentation she discusses the process of re-imagining her textual essay to a film essay.

Ehsan Fardjadnyia will talk about and show video documentations of the intervention “Polacy! Refugees and Citizens” that he organized in 2016 in the Warsaw Uprising Museum and at the Frontext Headquarters of the EU border control. He will discuss the construction and erasure of particular narrative in the Warsaw Uprising Museum, what the collective intervention aimed to achieve, how it was perceived and reflect on some of its continuing aftermaths.

Tanel Rander will present his artistic research on East Europe, subjectivity and decolonial option, with a focus on the ideology of transformation from post-socialist era to the present day. This ideology comprises of the concept of otherness and the mechanisms that apply it on history, memory, knowledge and subjectivity. “The guillotine effect” is an idea that Rander uses to describe the mechanisms of erasure in the production of contemporaneity in the post-socialist public space and public art – for example, the fall of socialist art and the rehabilitation of dissident avant-garde in Eastern Europe.

Hodan Warsawa and Tirza Balk will discuss their intervention “Decolonizing the museum” realized at the Tropenmuseum last year:

“Decolonize The Museum is an effort to confront the colonial ideas and practices present in ethnographic museums up until this day. We have worked throughout 2015 to stage a joint intervention in the Dutch National Museum of World Cultures. This intervention critiques the language, imagery and accessibility of its current exhibitions. Our intent is firstly to expose the violence perpetuated by ethnographic museums by critiquing its Eurocentrism, white supremacy, its assumed neutrality and its excuses of “only having so much time/space”. We base this critique on the museum experience of ourselves and our friends whose heritage is studied and analysed, but who, ourselves, are seldom the target group of ethnographic museums. Simultaneously, we push a conversation about how – if at all – the ethnographic museum can contribute to reinstating the agency and histories of colonized peoples, life and territories. Last but not least, Decolonize The Museum is about educating and challenging the organization so that neo-liberal conceptions of ‘diversity’ do not become the limit of change for these institutions.”

27 May 2017, 5 -7 pm: Archive Poetry

Book presentations and a peek into the archives of the artists

Ruth van Beek: The Cast
Batia Suter: Parallel Encyclopedia #2

Ruth van Beek and Batia Suter both generate a personal image library and, by using different strategies, edit and re-create its content into parallel living realities.

The Cast
The Cast draws from the artist’s growing archive of found photographic source material taken from vintage books and magazines. Activated through contextual and physical refiguration, her work transforms these clippings from silent paper objects to vivid biomorphic actors.

Parallel Encyclopedia #2
Batia Suter’s work intuitively situates found images in new contexts to provoke surprising reactions and significative possibilities. This volume follows on from the first ‘Parallel Encyclopedia’, published in 2007. Underlying themes of Suter’s practice are the “iconification” and “immunogenicity” of old images, and the circumstances by which they become charged with new associative values. With an attuned sensitivity to hidden harmonies and expressive accidents, Suter thus generates hypnagogic spaces where pictures can communicate by their own logic, in a force field of imaginative metamorphosis.

 

 

24 May 2017: Book Lunch # 3

Book Lunch # 3
With El Corruptor from Colombia and Ruja Press from Rotterdam/London
Wednesday 24 May, from 12.00 to 13.15

Bring your own lunch, we povide you with tea and coffee. Places are limited, so please send us an email if you would like to join. More information on our website.

El Corruptor is a Colombian project, based in Bogota, dedicated to the production and promotion of queer and gay artistic expressions. El Corruptor curates gay art exhibitions and they produce limited edition publications and screen print works.

The Rotterdam based editorial RUJA Press was founded in London by artist/architect Ruohong Wu and artistJose Ja Ja Ja. RUJA PRESS aims to construct open dialogues with alternative languages of art, focussing on experimental digital drawing, abstract comics, visual arts and exhibitions.

10 May 2017 Book Lunch #2

On the occasion of Flaneur magazine’s visit to Rotterdam we organised a lunch meeting with some members of the local publishing scene.

With:

Fabian Saul en Grashina Gabelmann of Flaneur Magazine
Charlie Koolhaas: ‘What happened in Rotterdam?’
Conversas Rotterdam / Oana Clitan: Conversas #81 – #90
Publication Studio Rotterdam /Yin Yin Wong: ‘Tourist Visa’ by Sumantra Mukherjee
Thomas Walskaar (PrintRoom): My Hard-Drive Died Along With My Heart
Asnate Bockis: Siroop Rotterdam

In collaboration with and thanks to OMI, Rotterdam and Het Nieuwe Instituut


Flaneur is a nomadic, independent magazine focussing on one street per issue. The magazine embraces the street’s complexity, its layers and fragmented nature with a literary approach. The content of the magazine is produced with and for Flaneur by artists of all disciplines while the team spends two months on location. It is made using a collaborative, impulsive and unconventional approach. The magazine attempts to use a single microcosm to tell universal stories.